A Fighter for Freedom on Two Fronts

February 23, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Lucretia Mott, hired as a teacher in 1808, was shocked to find out that she was paid three times less than her colleagues who were male. For the rest of her long life, she helped spread the unpopular notion that women were men's equals and ought to have the same rights. But most of her energies went to the fight against slavery, which was not just unpopular but dangerous: in 1838 a mob in Philadelphia burned down the hall where abolitionists met. Enraged at the mingling of white women with black people during the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, the angry crowd was diverted on the way to Mott's house, while she stood in the parlor to meet them. Two years later she found that women were not wanted at the World Anti-Slavery convention in London, so she helped plan the world's first convention for women's rights.

After moving to the country from Philadelphia, her house became a stop on the underground railroad.

 

 

 


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